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Learn Common English Phrasal verbs with 'OUT'

Phrasal verbs with 'OUT'

In English there are many phrasal verbs with the preposition OUT. This week let’s look at some examples that are common in spoken English.

Ask out
To invite somebody, especially on a date.

“I’d like to ask Jennifer out, but I’m too shy!”

Back out
To withdraw from something one has agreed to do.

“Ken said he would help me move this weekend but he backed out at the last minute. I had to do everything by myself!”

Phrasal verbs in the news!



English prepositions from Twitter "Wait FOR..."



What have you waited for lately?

Learn how to use the easily confused English words "Hear & Listen"

Hear & Listen


In English we use the words hear and listen often. The meanings are similar but we use them differently and they can be easy to confuse. Use this blog to help you understand the differences with some examples :)

Definitions from:

"I can hear the people talking at the table next to me."

hear 

VERB
to be aware of sounds with your earsI can't hear very well.hear something/somebody She heard footsteps behind her.I couldn't hear anything.hear somebody/something doing something He could hear a dog barking.hear somebody/something do something Did you hear him go out?I heard a car drive off.hear what… Didn't you hear what I said?somebody/something is heard to do something She has been heard to make threats to her former lover.

"I was listening to the speaker at the meeting."

listen

 VERB
 to pay attention to somebody/something that you can hearListen! What's that noise? Can you hear it?Sorry, I wasn't really listening.He had been listening at the door.listen to somebody/something to listen to musicI listened carefully to her story.You haven't been listening to a word I've said!
 You cannot ‘listen something’ (without ‘to’):
I'm fond of listening to classical music. I'm fond of listening classical music.

*We report information that we learned by saying "I heard..."
"I heard Richard got a promotion."

*We use listen to to mean pay attention to something or someone. (See definition above)
"I listen to English news on the train."
"Don't listen to James, he's a liar."




A blast from the past! Re-post from July 2013 - Idiom "Break the ice"

A blast from the past! Re-post from July 2013

Break the ice
Break the ice means to warm up an uncomfortable situation. To start a conversation with a new person or people.
Asking about some one's interests is a nice way to break the ice. "Did you have a nice weekend? What did you do?"
"Everyone at the party was very quiet, finally Jim told a joke and broke the ice. After that people began talking to each other."


Increase your English vocabulary by learning (STILL MORE!) suffixes

In English there are many MANY suffixes used with some very common words. So far we have learned the suffixes en (The function of en is to change adjectives or nouns into verbs), able (able means able to be; possible)  like (like means resembling or having the same characteristic).

Today we'll learn the suffix -ness and what it means as an English suffix.

The suffix -ness means state (condition) or quality. Words (usually adjectives) with the suffix ness become nouns. Please look at the following examples:

"After a great dinner and coffee I thanked my host for his kindness and went home." = I really appreciated how kind my host was. Kind is an adjective, kindness is a noun.

"You are a great hostess, thank you for your kindness!"
"Airport security need a high level of awareness to be good at their job." = Security needs to be very aware so they can see anything suspicious or strange. Aware is an adjective, awareness is a noun.


"As it got late the darkness spread across the land..." = It became dark. Dark is an adjective, darkness is a noun.


Some more common examples:

We often talk about happiness, but too many people focus their attention on negative things.

I missed a lot of school because of illness last year.

Do you know some more words that end with -ness? Use them in a sentence and write them in the comment section!

Increase your English vocabulary by learning (EVEN MORE!) suffixes

In English there are many MANY suffixes used with some very common words. So far we have learned the suffixes en (The function of en is to change adjectives or nouns into verbs); able (able means able to be; possible).

Today we'll learn the suffix -like and what it means as an English suffix.
The suffix -like means resembling or having the same characteristic. Look at the following examples:

"My uncle Lester is a lot of fun and he doesn't take life too seriously. He's very childlike, he doesn't really worry about anything." = My uncle's character is like a child, similar to someone very young.

"The lion and tiger robots at Disney look amazing! I know they are just machines, but they are so lifelike!" = The robots look like real animals, they resemble real lions and tigers.
"Robots in movies are so lifelike nowadays don't you think?"
You can add -like to almost any noun. This is helpful sometimes when you describe something to another person, especially for animals or someone's behavior.

"A tanuki is a raccoonlike animal that lives in Japan."

*If someone behaves well in a game or competition we can say they are very sportsmanlike.

"The opposite uses the prefix UN. You get a red card if you are UNsportsmanlike."






Test your English thinking skill with another FUN brain teaser!


What happens twice in a week, and 
once in a year, but never in a day?


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Are you sure?
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Try 1 more time!
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Answer:

The letter e
There are 2 in the word week and 1 in the word year but none in the word day!

Increase your English vocabulary by learning (MORE!) suffixes

On April 11th we learned what a suffix is
"A suffix is an addition to the end of a word, that gives the word a new meaning." 

In English there are many MANY suffixes used with some very common words. The most common are probably the suffixes we use for comparisons 'bigger' and superlatives 'biggest.'

Today let's look at the suffix able.
The suffix -able means able to be; possible. Look at the following examples:

"Most automobile accidents are preventable." = Most car accidents are able to be (can be) prevented.

"Greg was in a bad car accident 2 days ago. Luckily Greg is okay but his car was badly damaged. It isn't drivable anymore." = The car is so damaged that it doesn't work, it can't be driven. It is not possible to drive it anymore.

"I tried to make lemonade when I was 4, but it was too sour! It looked good but it wasn't even drinkable!" = The lemoade was so sour you weren't able to drink it.


Do you know some English words that end in able
Write a sentence in the comment section using your word!

News & Video - "Simulation of texting at Shibuya crossing goes viral"

Here is a computer simulation of 1500 people crossing the street at Shibuya Crossing in Tokyo Japan while looking down at their cell phones.

simulation - a situation where a set of conditions is created artificially in order to study or experience something that could exist or happen in reality.

The text in the video is in Japanese but there is an English translation of the results of the simulation below the video plus a link to the original article.



What would happen if 1,500 pedestrians walked across the famous crossing in front of Tokyo’s Shibuya Station while using their smartphones?

Only 36 percent would make it to the other side because many would bump into each other or fall, according to a computer simulation by NTT Docomo Inc. that is generating a buzz on the Internet. (becoming popular)

As the trend in texting while walking grows, the carrier decided to study how much danger pedestrians were risking, it said. The simulation set up 1,500 people walking at speeds of 3, 4 or 6 kph. Each simulated pedestrian was 160 cm tall and weighed 58 kg, the median (average) for Japanese.

It assumed that pedestrians who text while walking have a range of vision one-twentieth (1/20th) that of normal, so they cannot see obstacles until they are 1.5 meters away. Pedestrians who fail to avoid a collision either apologize, fall down or drop their phone.

The pedestrians had 46 seconds to cross before the signal turned red.

The result of the simulation was that there were 446 collisions leading to 103 cases of falling and 21 dropped phones. Only 547 pedestrians crossed without incident (a problem).

Improve English listening - News story "Walking and Texting"


Listening Practice!

Listen to the audio and fill in the missing words:



Listen to the audio and fill in the missing words from the news story. 
You can easily pause the audio and take time to write your answers. When you are done look at Monday's blog post to see the complete story and check your answers.
Good Luck!!!

We're all aware of the dangers of _______ and driving -- it's not wise to take your eyes off the road when _______ down the freeway surrounded by steel and glass -- but what about texting and _______? There's at least one medical professor out there who believes that walking and text _______ is even more dangerous than texting and driving.

According to Dietrich Jehle, professor of emergency medicine at the University of Buffalo, texting and walking is responsible for more injuries per mile than ______ and texting.

"Pedestrian injuries are particularly dangerous because there's no protective area __________ you when you're hit by a car. We always view pedestrian injuries as kind of high risk ______." Jehle said.

The numbers are incredible. Over the course of a year, around 41,000 pedestrians visit the _______ room with some kind of injury. Out of those, up to 15 percent, or more than 6,100, are the result of someone using a mobile phone while walking.

Jehle has seen all kinds of injuries ______ from texting and walking. Pelvic fractures, head injuries as pedestrians are tossed up onto a car and into the windshield, _______ down stairs, walking into walls... the list goes on. Play it safe folks -- if you need to write a text, stop _______ and be still.

Improve English vocabulary - News story "Walking and Texting"


Texting and Walking Is Hazardous To Your Health Too (But You Knew That)

Thursday, March 06, 2014

We're all aware of the dangers of texting and driving -- it's not wise to take your eyes off the road when speeding down the freeway surrounded by steel and glass -- but what about texting and walking? There's at least one medical professor out there who believes that walking and text messaging is even more dangerous than texting and driving.

According to Dietrich Jehle, professor of emergency medicine at the University of Buffalo, texting and walking is responsible for more injuries per mile than driving and texting.

"Pedestrian injuries are particularly dangerous because there's no protective area surrounding you when you're hit by a car. (In a car accident you are protected by the car’s body, but as a pedestrian you are not.) We always view pedestrian injuries as kind of high risk injuries," Jehle said.

The numbers are incredible. Over the course of a year, around 41,000 pedestrians visit the emergency room with some kind of injury. Out of those, up to 15 percent, or more than 6,100, are the result of someone using a mobile phone while walking.


Jehle has seen all kinds of injuries resulting from texting and walking. Pelvic fractures, head injuries as pedestrians are tossed up onto a car and into the windshield, falling down stairs, walking into walls... the list goes on. Play it safe folks -- if you need to write a text, stop walking and be still.

Pelvic fractures
fracture = break
A pelvic fracture is a broken pelvis (hip)

"This is your pelvic (hip) bone."

Do you walk and text? (I do sometimes!)

Do you drive and text?

Do you text while you do something else?

PLEASE BE CAREFUL!

Increase your English vocabulary by learning prefixes #4

RE
*In English we use the prefix RE to mean AGAIN.

"The teacher was unhappy with my report. She told me to redo it." = do again

"Mike repainted his house last weekend. It looks great now!" = paint again

both of these words are verbs


Here is a video I made last year explaining the prefixes 

UN and RE




Increase your English vocabulary by learning prefixes #3


OVER
*In English we use the prefix OVER to mean EXCESSIVELY or COMPLETELY. 

"I can't believe the team lost the league championship after such a strong season. I guess they thought the final would be easy so they got overconfident." = excessively (too) confident

"I was overjoyed when I found out that I won a free vacation!" = completely happy

both of these words are adjectives


UNDER
*In English we use the prefix UNDER to mean BELOW or NOT ENOUGH. 

"I'm gonna send this hamburger back. It's undercooked." = not cooked enough

"Peter applied for a new job but he was underqualified." = lacking the qualifications

both of these words are adjectives


"We were overconfident for the game. The challengers played great!
Unfortunately we underestimated them and they beat us."

*Can you guess the meaning of underestimate?

Increase your English vocabulary by learning prefixes #2

In English we have a few prefixes with a meaning of NO, NON or OPPOSITE. Last time we learned about the prefix DIS so today let's look at some more prefixes with a similar meaning.

IN/IM

"My boss was angry because my assignment was incomplete." = not complete

"Jerry can't finish that report by Friday! That's impossible!" = not possible

both of these words are adjectives

IL/IR

"Riding a motorcycle on the sidewalk is illegal. I know, I tried it last weekend!" = not legal


"Most verbs in English become past tense when you add 'ED' but some verbs are irregular." = not regular

both of these words are adjectives

DE

A: "Can we have steak for dinner tomorrow night?"
B: "Sure, there are 2 steaks in the freezer. I'll put them in the fridge to defrost them tonight." = to become or make something warmer - defrost is a verb

UN

"Mister Donut in Tokyo has unlimited refills on coffee! I can drink as much as I want!" = no limit
unlimted is an adjective



Increase your English vocabulary by learning prefixes



Many English words use prefixes. A prefix is an addition to the beginning of a word, that gives the word a new meaning. Here is an example:

disconnect

dis is an example of a prefix. If we know the root word and the function of the prefix we can easily increase our vocabulary. For example:

connect (verb) means - to join together two or more things
"I connected my new printer to my computer so I could print my English homework."
The function of dis (prefix) can mean - reverse action; get rid of
Can you guess what disconnect means?
disconnect (verb) means - to separate something from something


"My ski disconnected from my boot while I was coming down the mountain."



The prefix 'dis' can also mean not; opposite of

Let's look at a few more examples of words with the prefix dis.

"I don't trust George, he seems dishonest to me." = I don't think George is honest.

"I disagree, I George has always been straight with me." = I don't agree, George has always told me the truth in the past (be straight = be honest)


More prefixes coming soon!


Learn 50 common English phrasal verbs! + Lots of real examples!

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