Today, tomorrow, the day after tomorrow...


Please look at the following calendar:



Lets pretend that today is Wednesday, February 9. We will start with future times, and an easy one, what do we call Thursday February 10th? Tomorrow of course! 
Now when we talk about Friday February 11th we will say "the day after tomorrow." 
"I will go to Hokkaido the day after tomorrow."
After Friday the 11th we count how may days forward and use the preposition IN. Remember that today is Wednesday, February 9, so if we want to talk about Saturday, February 12th we would say "IN 3 days."
"I will go to Hokkaido IN 3 days." = 3 days from today.
What would we say for Sunday the 13th? That's right! "IN 4 days."

Now past times, what do we call Tuesday, February 8th? Yesterday!
Now what do you think we call Monday, February 7th? We say "the day before yesterday." Past is the opposite of the future so we can remember....    
before <=> after        yesterday <=> tomorrow
"I went to Hokkaido the day before yesterday."
Before Monday, February 7th we count backwards and use the word AGO. Remember that today is Wednesday, February 9, so if we want to talk about Sunday February 6th we would say "3 days AGO."
"I went to Hokkaido 3 days AGO." = 3 days earlier.
What would we say for Saturday, February 5th? You got it! "4 days AGO."


"Where is my new computer!!! I ordered it 6 days AGO!!!"
"I'm sorry sir, your computer should arrive the day after tomorrow."

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